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BowTechExperience

Arrows snap as I was flexing them.

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With the season coming, I've been practicing a lot the last couple months. Been all over the forums here, there, everywhere. Lol. Anyway, recently there has been threads about guys having arrows snapping upon release and in some instances, sending carbon slivers and even part of the arrow into the shooters hand. It seems that in the quest for light and faster has the manufactures making ultra thin diameter shafts for us. The down side of this is a brittle, thin shaft that cannot stand up to the punishment of stacking groups or very hard impacts. I'm reasonable and do not really expect a shaft to withstand an impact to a cinder block, but they should be able to withstand a little smacking or kissing when grouping in a target. I get it that we should always check our arrows when shooting, but who is actually doing it. I know I don't and in over the 25 plus years bowhunting, I've never had an arrow shatter upon release and thank  god today was no different, BUT I did flex my arrows tonight after shooting a round at 20 yards because of all the horror stories I have been reading. Well Well Well. I pull my arrows from the bale, put them in my quiver and walk back to shoot another round, but then it dawns on me to flex the arrows because guys are saying there could be issues. So I pull out the first arrow, flex it and it SNAPS into 4 pieces. Are you kidding me????  Well that sucks big time. I pull out another arrow I just shot and it snaped in half. Holly #$%& Batman!!!!!!. Well I guess I'm done with the thin walled ultra light shafts from any Manufacturer....

 

 

FLEX CHECK your arrows guys just to be on the safe side. Not worth a trip to the ER and possibly a season ender event....

 

 

Be Safe and all the best this season.... Go Team 9 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Edited by BowTechExperience

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After watching my buddies Carbon Express Maxima 350 break in half at a 3-D shoot upon release, I switched to Easton ACC Pro Hunters. He's lucky he didn't get hurt. Good thing your checking your arrows, must be a bitch getting all that carbon out of your hand.

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I went back to the full metal jackets this year. Don't know why I ever switched. They fly great and hit like a ton of bricks. Glad you didn't have that happen when you were shooting.

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I assume those arrows are alot thinner than the ics hunter 340s, right?

 

Yes they are. Flex your arrows anyway to be on the safe side. Look for dings in the carbon from impact from another shaft.

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Interesting.  We see some of this in fly fishing which uses more or less the same materials with designers always searching for lighter and stronger.  Of course, fly rods aren't whipping through the air at the speeds of modern arrows, so I've never heard of anyone getting carbon/graphite fibers in their hands when a rod blows up.  Typically, the fly rods break because they have a weak spot created by a bead head fly smashing into the rod or the rod hitting something like a tree branch or being stepped on and weakened.  Looks like I'll be keeping a closer eye on my arrows.

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I can't say I do it every arrow, every shot, but I do check my arrows a lot because a fist full of carbon arrow is the last thing I want. For anyone that doesn't already know it, ALWAYS check them thoroughly if they've slapped each other or hit something hard. Look especially close for hair line fractures near the insert and nock, as well as all along the shaft. While flexing, listen for any "cracking sounds" as well.

 

I shoot thicker walled Easton arrows, and fortunately I've never had an issue, the only thin-walled arrows I shoot are for indoor. But it's always a concern with any arrow, especially carbons because the defects can be harder to see and the failure is more catastrophic.

 

Glad you caught those arrows before they had a chance to fail on release.

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I will use up what I have remaining. I've checked and rechecked my remaining arrows and whatever I end up with at the end of the season will be tossed in the garbage. Would'nt sell them to anyone so I will trash them.

 

Definately will be looking very closely at the FMJ's for sure.

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The FMJ's and ACC's are both very good arrows. What won me over to the FMJ's was the smaller diameter and thicker wall. Also the aluminum outside makes them much easier to pull out of a 3D target.

  • Agree 1

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The same can happen with wood as well...I was"lucky" enough to send a wood arrow thru my hand years ago.

 

I guess the shaft cracked while shooting a 3d course ....the next shot with that arrow sent 1/2 of it thru my left hand then the arrow snapped leaving a 6" splinter between my thumb and index finger....rather painful...

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The same can happen with wood as well...I was"lucky" enough to send a wood arrow thru my hand years ago.

 

I guess the shaft cracked while shooting a 3d course ....the next shot with that arrow sent 1/2 of it thru my left hand then the arrow snapped leaving a 6" splinter between my thumb and index finger....rather painful...

 

I remember that. Ouch!!!

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Glad you did not get hurt, I like my Axis arrows. I have put those babies through  3/4" T-11 siding and they are still in my hunting quiver.

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