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chenrossi

NJW&W Members
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    99
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About chenrossi

  • Rank
    Button Buck

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  • Gender
    Male
  • County, State
    Salem County, New Jersey

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222 profile views
  1. chenrossi

    Early goose

    Been bananas the past couple days on honks. Been doing it phenomenally.
  2. chenrossi

    Early goose

    The thing I do that most others don't, is I don't brine birds. I think brining it sets you up to dry the bird out and making it more susceptible to cooking fast..which means the bird you think you were cooking medium ends up well done. And that's no good. I keep it pretty simple, but I never brine. I think it is a huge help IMO. My best recommendations to you would be (if you haven't had them of course): 1) Jalapeno poppers. Just can't go wrong with them. Great for football games..plus they're a good novelty to introduce people to wild game. 2) A bbq pulled pork mccormick's packet in the crockpot on low..add sweet baby rays hickory and brown sugar when the goose in tender and pulls apart with two forks..easy lunch sandwiches... 3) Marinate in soy sauce and blackened cajun bbq...cook to medium, then char both sides to give it a nice crust.
  3. chenrossi

    Early goose

    I have eaten it, I do like it....but I rarely fish the salt..maybe 3-4 times for fluke and stripers....so I wouldn't consider myself someone who eats it regularly..
  4. chenrossi

    Early goose

    ^ Just sounds to me like a lack of preparation and a lack of care. Residents are good...migrants are better...but snows are best...no different than a ribeye if you take care of it, prep it right, and cook it right. Maybe better. Not sure how anyone could come to conclude that an animal that eats grain, beans, corn, etc could possibly taste bad...
  5. chenrossi

    Early goose

    Logged another 3 hunts..hoping to get in another 4 before the season closes. Been doing really well.
  6. chenrossi

    NJ Deer Zones

    Unfortunate this resource isn't more visibly seen. It's a great tool to know boundaries of WMAs, Zones, etc.
  7. chenrossi

    Old hunting roots

    Neat stuff. I'll add. My grandfather gave me a bunch of old waterfowl books from the 50s-80s, which I started reading one a week this summer. I found this old compendium in one of the books. Really interesting to read through.
  8. chenrossi

    The future of our sport

    I get so tired of hearing an argument that the license fee structure is the issue here. I've looked into this here and in several other states I have hunted and lived in. The AVERAGE (let me emphasize average) hunter in NJ spends a little over $60 in licenses a year. Average. Don't go running for the hills about permits this, stamps that you, the diehard guy buy. The average hunter in this state spends about $60. It ranges from most basic $27.50 firearms license to hunters spending upwards of $3-400. There is certainly most likely bias amongst us on this forum and we do likely spend more than the average guy. With that being said, for someone to bemoan paying $60...lets go crazy and say $150-200 in licensing and permits. I would be willing to bet a week's paycheck those same hunters have no problem going to an Eagles game for 3 hours watching a game at some ungodly price, taking the family out to a dinner at some restaurant and dropping $100 in an hour. I could go on and on and list the things guys would crap out money for they get an hour...a day maybe out of for the equivalent price. A DAY. We get a whole friggin year at whatever price you pay. And let's be real too, we pay it. Are we really going to say, no buck tag this time...or no muzzleloader permit this time because we are justifying that $28 is too much money? Or are we using that as the escape and excuse when it's other things that are actually impeding our participation, but we are trying to convince ourselves $28 is expensive? It is all the additional items that inflate the cost of hunting. Guys spend hundreds..thousands of dollars on bait (insane), mineral blocks, stands, decoys, leases, gas to and from. Somehow it always comes back to the licenses and permits.... which the fee structure hasn't changed in like 20 years and for that we should be fortunate.
  9. chenrossi

    Pflüger Patriarchs with Mojo and Abu Garcia Rods

    $80 each, $150 for both.
  10. chenrossi

    Rage 3-blade with practice tips

    Bow season starts Saturday!
  11. chenrossi

    Early goose

    Had 3-4 big bunches Saturday that got a 5-gun salute. No bands. Yesterday was better, more spaced out, smaller flocks. Killed another good bunch. 5 bands. God was it hot out though. Today was so-so. Not hunting again till Friday when it cools down a bit.
  12. chenrossi

    Pflüger Patriarchs with Mojo and Abu Garcia Rods

    ttt, someone take them off my hands this week!
  13. chenrossi

    Rage 3-blade with practice tips

    ttt, take them!
  14. chenrossi

    The future of our sport

    Senior bow increases are because those who previously purchased resident bow/all-around are now eligible for senior licenses. There was only an uptick in bow sales when Sunday hunting and crossbows were legalized. That being said, it just goes back to my initial point that baby boomers are aging out. Age is the driving factor for the decline. The "increases" are subjective. Someone who bought an all-around in a given year may have bought separate firearms and archery licenses in years prior and vice versa. Bow hunting compared to firearms is regionally growing to a small extent... Bottom line though is there are 'increases' in certain things, but what that boils down to is less people purchasing more things. I.e., less of us are footing more the bill. The perception is not quite reality.
  15. chenrossi

    The future of our sport

    Biggest reason for the decline is that baby boomers are aging out of the sport. Next 8-12 years, it's going to get really bad...And we are not recruiting enough hunters to backfill those that are leaving the ranks..and less individuals in their mid-40s to 50s hunt and/or fish compared to those 20-30 years ago who are beginning to age out now.. People can point to lack of access, land development, other competing interests, lack of interest, technology, whatever...all of which are factors that may influence one's desire to hunt or not, but the reality is that we are failing to develop new hunters who have the ambition and passion to continue it. I constantly hear parents talk about how their kids would rather play on an Xbox or do this or that than fish or hunt with them. Who's fault is that?