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If I can't kill a deer...


Jerseygti337

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Yep its an 18" WSM, using the minion method this thing is super easy to maintain temps.

 

I do the same thing.  I can hold 250°F for almost 12 hours without adding coal.

 

I did at least 3 full briskets (11#+) and five pork shoulders with it this year.  Slow and low makes a world of difference.  I've never had better brisket and pork shoulder ever.

 

I usually wrap in foil at 160°F and then finish up around 195°F - 205°F.  Let it sit for 1-3 hours, and then cut/pull for serving.

Sapere aude.

Audeamus.

When you cannot measure, your knowledge is meager and unsatisfactory.

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I do the same thing. I can hold 250°F for almost 12 hours without adding coal.

 

I did at least 3 full briskets (11#+) and five pork shoulders with it this year. Slow and low makes a world of difference. I've never had better brisket and pork shoulder ever.

 

I usually wrap in foil at 160°F and then finish up around 195°F - 205°F. Let it sit for 1-3 hours, and then cut/pull for serving.

Nice! So far I've done a bunch of ribs and butts and they have all turned out pretty good but I still need work on my pork finishing sauce. I've been wanting to try a brisket but haven't got around to it yet.

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You've got a nice meat probe, which is essential for smoking.  Keep the lid on and don't panic!  I got this one off of Amazon.  Comes with a remote so you can sit in the house or fall asleep on the couch while cooking.

 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B014DAVCP4/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

I cooked overnight for a BBQ the next day.  Started cooking around 11PM.  Used the remote temp thing with the temp alarm to wake me up at certain points to wrap with foil and then take it off the smoker.

 

There are different cuts of brisket.  I get the whole brisket, which barely fits on the top of the smoker.  I have to use a block of wood underneath it to pitch up the center of the brisket and pull the ends in slightly.  Once it shrinks, you can take the block of wood out.  A full brisket is about 11#-13# uncooked.

 

There are two important pieces of fat on the brisket:  one runs right through the center of the meat, and the other is the fat cap.  You need the fat cap to melt into the meat while cooking, but you don't want it to be too thick.  0.5"-1" is good.  This keeps the meat moist and very flavorful.  I've always wrapped at 160°F, but might try to cook it straight through instead one of these times.  Wrapping it keeps it very moist, but you want to cook it at a higher temp (250°F) to set the bark earlier.

 

Plan about 8 hours for a full brisket, cooking time.  Another 1-3 for it to rest in a cooler.  I have an old Omaha Steaks styrofoam cooler that I use.  There is a big difference between taking it off and serving it or taking it off and letting it rest.  If you have a chance to let it rest, go for it.  If not, it'll still be very good.

 

Good luck, and post photos when you're done!

Sapere aude.

Audeamus.

When you cannot measure, your knowledge is meager and unsatisfactory.

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Thanks, my probe has the same remote and alarms as your describing but I want to get another so I can monitor meat and grate temps. I've also done the same overnights with pork butts and also wrapped to get past the stall and they turned out awesome.

 

With the brisket, do you separate the point from the flat when your done and make burnt ends or anything like that? I'm still new to brisket in general but have been reading a lot on smokingmeatforum which has lots of info.

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I usually just slice it up, I don't separate the point from the flat.  If you wrap a brisket, it's going to be very moist throughout, and at 195°F-205°F it's all well done.  It falls apart and most people will slap it between a bun or eat it with a fork not knowing the difference.  It'll just be good, and that's all that matters.

 

If you like burnt ends, you probably don't want to wrap it and let it dry out a bit.

Sapere aude.

Audeamus.

When you cannot measure, your knowledge is meager and unsatisfactory.

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