Jump to content
IGNORED

Checking trail cameras


Recommended Posts

I have been using different methods recently when I check my cameras. I have been checking them on foot, tractor, atv and using cell cams which I think is the least intrusive. I still have many cams, you still need to physically check, change batteries etc. I usually check around mid day when I get the chance but not always the case. I have some cameras on trails leading in and out of bedding areas which no matter what time of day, you will most likely encounter deer. What I have found and it may seem crazy, is not sneaking in to check the camera. Ive used an atv or tractor, during the day and night and basically just go slow enough for the deer to hear it coming. I have seen deer literally hold tight bedded or just stand literally 30 yards and not move from the machine. Ive also been checking cams at night , I know Im bumping deer off the food plots so I think its better to check the feeding area cameras mid day. Checking cams at night in and around bedding areas would probably make more sense at night since most deer will probably be out of the bedding areas and lounging around the feeding areas so it may be better to check a camera at different times depending on its location. I am also starting to spray down the camera after touching it, I see lots of pics even days after its been checked of deer sniffing the camera. What if any, are some of your strategies for checking trail cameras. Im interested to see how others do it and what reaction you get from the deer positive or negative.

www.liftxrentals.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found placing the camera about 5 foot off the ground. angled slightly down has seemed to make the camera WAY less visible to the deer around it.

I dont get any of the deer up against the camera etc.

seems that since the infrared glow isnt as obvious to them they dont know its there.

 

I like checking my cams mid day as they are in areas the deer are normally out of at that time

Captain Dan Bias

REELMUSIC SPORTFISHING

50# Striper live release club.

 

http://reelmusicsportfishing.blogspot.com/

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always check my cams at times I would normally be walking to my stands. I also use the same route going in and out as I would be hunting. When I have deer (and particularly target animals) on cam the days I check my cams and in shooting light, I know I'm in the right spot. I keep a steady schedule of when I go in and out of spots. I also pay close attention to what times animals are there to understand where and why they are coming from and going (or how close they are bedding).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love my cell cams (just started using them this year) but to get more information on an important spot, I usually have several others also.

"Well Behaved Women Seldom Make History" - Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

 

NJ State Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs Member
NRA Life Member

NWTF Women In The Outdoors Member

UBNJ Member



 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with not being stealthy....use an ATV or drive your truck right up to them.    Going at night is an option but frankly....I'm not that dedicated.  

 

I think if you go slow and obvious, you will either be ignored or you push them off instead of startling them.  Where I hunt (I feel like) they are used to moving around humans and so long as they don't "feel hunted" they return to their normal patterns after the human intrusion ends.  

 

I also put all my cams "one stick high".  I bring out a single climbing stick and stand on top of it and use the screw in mounts.  With only one climbing stick I don't put a lineman's belt on or bring my harness with me, I just wing it.  I'm about 6 feet tall so the cam ends out probably about 9 feet up angled down.  I am trying cell cams where it's really thick and is hard to access (I recently bought 2 of the moultire mobile set ups...we'll see how that goes)

Edited by dlist777
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I only go during two times of the day/night. I go in midday or late at night, not right after last light but at least a few hours after. I do the same thing with the one spot that I bait. I generally dont mind bumping deer in the dark. I dont like going to and from, during the hours Im going to be hunting. I dont want to be bumping them at the time I could be in a tree. Thats the thought process in my head atleast, for right or wrong. Just like you dont want them picking you out of your tree, in a sense, its the same principle. I try my best to leave things undisturbed during those prime times. I typically have been putting my cams up 10-12 feet and the deer, even bucks, dont seem to mind. I notice a lot less looking at the cam compared to putting them at lower heights. My main reason for putting them up high is theft prevention but the deer not noticing them as much is a nice bonus. 

 

If I had the spots, I would use an atv to go to my cams but that is out of the question for me...and I currently dont have one anyway.

 

 

I read an article about "fluid movement" and it spoke about places deer are forced to interact with people that use hiking trails with horses, talking on the phone or with one another and how deer will typically hold tight. The sudden stop of movement in these areas will cause deer to go on high alert but continuing on your way may prove more valuable at times where they are used to seeing people MOVE and not associating that with danger. This was in regards to suburban hunting in NJ and not any rural areas or in the middle of the pines. 

 

 

EDIT: Im looking forward to the days Im able to pick up a cell cam or three. I think that is the best way to go. I havnt used them yet but from what Ive heard and learned, along with the principle of not having to intrude on an area more than you have to, they are the way to go, just more expensive.

Edited by outdoorslife
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some of my bow spots are in close proximity to houses.  I do not take the same precautions of spraying down while checking the cards as I do in bigger pieces, but know I should.

 

I have had deer appear on camera not 10 minutes after I left. I do try to go mid day when they are in bedding areas and hopefully not near my stands.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On my farm in the Midwest, I check cams in the middle of the night sometimes when I arrive to hunt, I don't like to in fear of bumping deer off the property that may be on the property for the morning hunt. Around food plots, I check cams after a morning hunt and cams close to bedding areas I like to check on the way in and out of stands. After hunting season starts, absolutely no atvs except if a deer is down and it gets taken out after dark. Suburban deer tolerate a lot more human intrusion than a big woods/ag country deer.

www.liftxrentals.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm going tomorrow morning to check 1 of cameras that hasn't been checked since end of September. Very curious to see what I have on there. I will be sure to post pics as long as the buck I'm after is on there. Last year I had him on camera a handful of times but never seen him in stand. I found both of his sheds in February he was an 120" 8 point. Can't wait to see how big he got this year. I named him Tall Tines

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...