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I've learned something new recently, thought I share it..

 

" You can put your cock vane or feather any way in the arrow rest "

 

 

For best results in shooting you always want your spine up or down. Out to the side will be more prone to oscillation when in flight causing unstable arrow flight.

 

Ted shop black eagle arrow.jpg

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Good tip.

 

I started doing this when I got serious about target archery. Without a spine tester to help you find the stiff side, you can sometimes float the shafts in soapy water (with the ends plugged with nocks) (has to be soapy water to reduce surface tension). It works with most shafts, but sometimes they will not come up the same consistently. The "spine" can actually "spiral" around the shaft as it goes from nock to insert. Sometimes you can just look for the "seam" too.

 

Because of that, to save time, I usually just fletch them up and shoot arrows from long range now and turn the nock for a new cock fletch if an arrow is a "flyer". Eventually you can usually bring it in with the rest of them. Then just mark the new cock fletch with a sharpie. 

 

Also might not be worth mentioning since it seems rare to find compound finger shooters now, but I'm pretty sure finger shooters want to put the stiff side of the shaft consistently to one side since most of the flex they impart on the shaft is left/right. Release shooters experience mostly up/down flex related to nock travel. Hence stiff side up or down. I have to think anyway you built your arrows more consistently though would help. 

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Great point about the compound finger shooters, I will check into that more, but I think the answer is going to end up up or down still. Due to the reason a compound bows energy from cams is generated vertically, so by putting a the spine to the side its more prone to oscillation because arrow is working against vertical function of the bow.. It can cause arrow to circle in flight...

 

The issue with some of the popular ways of spine testing, I myself used to used a Ram spine tester,  #1 it can take a while to find the spine going by the gauge which is subject to a great deal of human error especially when you have arrows with little no variation.   #2 many people who use a spine tester dont realize arrows have multiple spines an finding the optimum spine is vital in the accuracy..# 3 some people also spine the arrow at full length an than cut the arrow, which is doing nothing. Carbon is often made in a roll so when you cut the arrow you just changed where the spine is.

 

Now with my new jig I can find optimum spine and spine test up to 1 doz arrows in about 2 minutes a lot more accurate and faster than ram spine tester or other similar methods. 

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Although I know nothing about arrows and their spines, I find an interesting correlation to graphite fly rods which also have a spine that needs to be identified to properly place the guides when building the rod.  It must be something related to the manufacturing of graphite that leads to them having a spine?  After all, both are tubular in design and not much different other than the taper a fly rod has to have.

Edited by Bucksnbows
"taper" not "tape"
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