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Any contractors willing to lend some advice?


dlist777

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We are in the process of buying a house.  The house was built in 2018 and other than this one issue appears to be in great shape.  In the inspection, the inspector noted that one of the floor joists for the first floor had been cut to make room for some plumbing (it is visible from the crawl space).  The inspector showed me and it was under one of the bathrooms which had a notable creak / popping when you stood in one part of the bathroom.  The seller agreed to fix.  I attached a pic of the fix below.  It appears to me that the seller put in a floor joist next to it and connected it to the cut floor joist.  63370.thumb.jpeg.a6ad4c70370fa2c2296738bc3f3d22ff.jpeg

I went to the house and went in the bathroom and it does seem to have fixed the creak/popping.  But, in my (very uninformed) opinion, this fix seems less than ideal.  Isn't a joist fixed like this inherently weakened?  

With the seller's market as is now, I will likely need to deal with this on my own.  But, whoever pays for it...I want it fixed right.  

Is current fix OK?  What's the "right way" to fix this?  

Thanks in advance!

Doug

 

 

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That fixes correct. Should have been done in the first place whoever put in the plumbing. You could put one on the other side too if you want. Screw in about 2 ft long blocks, then your plank on top of them.

“In a civilized and cultivated country, wild animals only continue to exist at all when preserved by sportsmen.” -Theodore Roosevelt

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1 minute ago, Booner said:

The sistered juice should land on structual load bearing supports. I.E.  a colum or wall. No support with what you show. 

Here is your answer^. The sistered joist should run to bearing points. If done as shown to be used like a fitch plate of sorts it should be 3/4” plywood or 3/8” steel bolted in triangular pattern

AWM

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Splicing is ok if its done right but I have never seen someone cutting out the entire joist to fit the pipe. I am assuming the pipe goes straight down to the floor? If so you can install a 4x4 right behind the pipe under the new joist. If you make it tight it will push the joist up and it may take care of your  problem above. 
On the splice make sure he put nails or screws in several places along the joist on top and bottom. 

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Thanks all.  I appreciate it.  @hunterbob1 ....Yes, it's ridiculous that this was done.  @Lunatic, yes....its straight down drain pipe.  

I'll have to get under there but I believe (as noted above) that the sister joist is NOT attached to any load bearing points.  I suspect it's just "floating" there connected to the cut joist....I can't see both ends but one definitely does not appear to be attached to load bearing.  So, I'll have to run one myself or hire someone.  

Just curious:  I like lunatic's idea of just putting in a 4x4 (maybe on a cement pad so it doesn't settle) and "cramming" it in to support the spliced joist.  Any opinion from the others on this vs. running a sister joist all along and attaching at load bearing points?

@Daktari

@Booner

@MGHunter66

@trapoholic

 

 

Edited by dlist777
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5 minutes ago, dlist777 said:

Thanks all.  I appreciate it.  @hunterbob1 ....Yes, it's ridiculous that this was done.  @Lunatic, yes....its straight down drain pipe.  

I'll have to get under there but I believe (as noted above) that the sister joist is NOT attached to any load bearing points.  I suspect it's just "floating" there connected to the cut joist....I can't see both ends but one definitely does not appear to be attached to load bearing.  So, I'll have to run one myself or hire someone.  

Just curious:  I like lunatic's idea of just putting in a 4x4 (maybe on a cement pad so it doesn't settle) and "cramming" it in to support the spliced joist.  Any opinion from the others on this vs. running a sister joist all along and attaching at load bearing points?

@Daktari

@Booner

@MGHunter66

@trapoholic

 

 

BTW I said 4x4 but I would use two 2x4s nailed together. 4x4s warp too much 

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