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Lack of Acorns


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The lack of acorns on my farm this year really affected the amount of bucks seen or on camera. My winter rye and clover plot did well until the first ice than the big snow before Christmas. Definitely alot more pics of racoons, squirrels, and critters on my mineral sites. That led to an increase of fox, coyote, and now bobcats. Anyone else see this in their areas?

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17 minutes ago, electric10162 said:

The lack of acorns on my farm this year really affected the amount of bucks seen or on camera. My winter rye and clover plot did well until the first ice than the big snow before Christmas. Definitely alot more pics of racoons, squirrels, and critters on my mineral sites. That led to an increase of fox, coyote, and now bobcats. Anyone else see this in their areas?

The rye goes dormant when temps drop into the upper 30s. 

As soon as it warms up it will start growing again. 

Having a diversity of food that produces at different times will help when mast crops fail. 

The deer just move over a bit and eat something else. 

Clover and rye can feed deer pretty much year round. 

Throw in some beans, brassicas, a few different varieties of apples and crab apples in combination with some hinge cutting for natural browse and now you have something. 

If something fails, theres something else to keep the deer around. 

If you have reliable year round food, you have deer. 

Start looking for someone to get in there with some lime in the next few months. 

It makes a difference

Edited by tcook8296

www.liftxrentals.com

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18 minutes ago, BHC said:

zero acorns in my area

what's the norm...every other year is a good crop of acorns? cause fall of 2019 was unreal !!

Since I bought the neighboring property in 2010, I have always had acorns. Yes, 2019 was a bumper crop. This year was brutal. I read somewhere that deer rely on protein and fat from acorns. In some areas up to 50%. 

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12 minutes ago, tcook8296 said:

The rye goes dormant when temps drop into the upper 30s. 

As soon as it warms up it will start growing again. 

Having a diversity of food that produces at different times will help when mast crops fail. 

The deer just move over a bit and eat something else. 

Clover and rye can feed deer pretty much year round. 

Throw in some beans, brassicas, a few different varieties of apples and crab apples in combination with some hinge cutting for natural browse and now you have something. 

If something fails, theres something else to keep the deer around. 

If you have reliable year round food, you have deer. 

Start looking for someone to get in there with some lime in the next few months. 

It makes a difference

Thanks Tom. I'll have you up for a visit.

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No acorns in any of the spots I hunt in nj, pa or ohio .

makes no sense as while there are banner years , it usually good in diffferent trees .

‘this year will def be tough on the deer if we get much more snow 

Captain Dan Bias

REELMUSIC SPORTFISHING

50# Striper live release club.

 

http://reelmusicsportfishing.blogspot.com/

 

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2 hours ago, electric10162 said:

The lack of acorns on my farm this year really affected the amount of bucks seen or on camera. My winter rye and clover plot did well until the first ice than the big snow before Christmas. Definitely alot more pics of racoons, squirrels, and critters on my mineral sites. That led to an increase of fox, coyote, and now bobcats. Anyone else see this in their areas?

I got more raccoons than I could count!

HONOR THE FALLEN
https://thefallen.militarytimes.com/
Over the years the US has sent many of its fine young men & women into great peril to fight for freedom beyond our borders. The only amount of land we have ever asked for in return, is enough to bury those that did not return. COLIN POWELL

 

 

 

 

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