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Straight on shot at 3 yards from the ground (THP)


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I don't know if anyone on here follow the hunting public on YouTube.  They had a PA public land challenge and a pretty neat episode.  I link to it below.  I'm interested in hearing fellow sportsman feedback.  If you want to skip, go to the 19:00 mark.  The hunter calls in a beautiful buck to 3 yards from the ground and shoots.  He's an accomplished hunter and archer.  It ends out getting only one lung and liver.  They do recover it, but it's not quick and you can tell at certain times during the recovery he is worried.   He clearly has a good bow set up for penetration because the arrow goes through and they recover the arrow.  

I know straight on shots are considered no/no's traditionally with archery equipment, but I wonder what you would honestly do in this situation.  I'm not looking to shame anyone or call into question their ethics.  Just if you were there, would you do it.  Waiting for a better angle isn't really an option.  

Honestly, I think I would have taken it.  I can't see me just letting him walk that close when I'm face to face that close.  Especially since he's at full draw when the buck comes out the grass (so it's not like a surprise face-to-face situation)  But, as you can see, a lot can go wrong even at 3 yards.

If you have time, watch the whole episode, it's kind of cool and you can get the build up, but if you just want to see the shot, go to 19:00 or so.  

 

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A straight on shot has a small area where you can get through into the vitals and the angle has to be perfect to get the vitals.  This buck appears to be slightly quartering from the hunter so yes it’s a low percentage shot.  It doesn't matter if it’s a crossbow, compound, a recurve, if you hit either leg/ shoulder bones you are most likely not going through to vitals nor will you have the right angle to get in there.  At even that close distance, a dee can react enough to change the point of impact.  I would rather shoot him in the throat patch at his spine, juggler, and windpipe.  Personally, I would never take that shot (head on) with any archery equipment.

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I would never take a straight on shot no matter how close with the compound. I've taken one quartering to shot and got lucky and got both lungs and he only made it about 60 yds, but would never do that again. Broad side or quartering away are only shots I will take.

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I would and I have taken this shot twice. Both from the ground. both times I and complete pass through and deer never made it past 30 yards.(crossbow)

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Edited by Lunatic
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I have taken this shot with a crossbow three times with very good results. I would never have attempted it with a compound. One was a 20 yd shot. The deer spun around and fell to the ground. Did not go two yards. Another was about 12 yds, the deer fell in it's tracks. The last was about 5 yds. The deer ran about 40 yds and expired. The blood was unbelievable from these shots. The first one bled so profusely that when it spun around I could see the blood pouring out. 

I am not advocating frontal shots. There is little room for error. But when considering how many broadside shots go astray, at the proper range, with the proper marksmanship,  frontal shots may be more successful. 

Once again, not advocating for everyone.  Crossbow accuracy and killing power changes the game on frontal shots. 

It is similar to the subject of neck/head shots with a firearm on deer. It is practiced by "meat" hunters around the world. There certainly is room for error there. 

Edited by archer36
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No for me.  History has shown me to let them walk past and then take the quartering away chip-shot, where I have chance to get liver, both lungs and heart all in one.  Most lethal shot there is. 

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1 minute ago, JHbowhunter said:

No for me.  History has shown me to let them walk past and then take the quartering away chip-shot, where I have chance to get liver, both lungs and heart all in one.  Most lethal shot there is. 

I don't think letting him walk past was an option here.  Not sure if you watched the video or not.....

But, in any case, I imagine it would still be a no for you.  

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This comes up every once in a while. I've taken the shot several times but only close in from a treestand. Devastating is the best way to describe the results. Clouds of visible atomized blood fill the air as the deer runs off. I took a frontal shot on a big doe once when there was snow on the ground. It was such a crime scene Gil Grissom showed up in a Suburban.

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I shot a nice buck straight in while walking to my stand, heard him grunting so I grunted back as he got closer I drew the bow and waited until we made eye contact at 5 yards, buried the arrow to the nock, he ran 40 yards and piled up. It was an opportunity I couldn't pass up

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1 hour ago, Gobblengrunt said:

A straight on shot has a small area where you can get through into the vitals and the angle has to be perfect to get the vitals.  This buck appears to be slightly quartering from the hunter so yes it’s a low percentage shot.  It doesn't matter if it’s a crossbow, compound, a recurve, if you hit either leg/ shoulder bones you are most likely not going through to vitals nor will you have the right angle to get in there.  At even that close distance, a dee can react enough to change the point of impact.  I would rather shoot him in the throat patch at his spine, juggler, and windpipe.  Personally, I would never take that shot (head on) with any archery equipment.

He’s shooting a heavy arrow, pretty sure over 550 gr maybe even 600 with a quality single bevel head and pretty high poundage bow. No bone in the front of that deer was going to stop it from being a fatal hit at close range with that angle. As far as the deer going pretty far after the shot if you watch some videos of dog trackers it’s amazing how far a deer can go even with just about perfect arrow placement even over a mile and lived for about 24 hours. So we just never know whats going to happen after the arrow flies. I’m sure just about all of us lost deer we thought was a perfect shot. 
 

I tend to agree on a full frontal shot being a very low percentage shot as the arrow could hit the bone  and veer off the wrong way missing vitals but as you said it was way more quarter to than full frontal. The deer was even slightly quarter to of the cameraman with hunter to the hard right making not really full frontal at all. 

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I guarantee you that most of the deer blood tracking dogs are called in for are on broadside shots. Bottom line is there are a lot of factors that effect a good shot. Distance, deflection, poor shooting, etc. It's up to the shooter to make the shot right as much as possible. If you said you took a frontal shot on a deer at 60 yds, I would say that's a very low percentage shot. At 20 yds or less, with a crossbow, it's a chip shot. 

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