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Muckmarsh

Pigeon Hunting

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19 minutes ago, hvnj said:

I believe banded pigeons are carrier or homing  pigeons. Passenger pigeon refers to an extinct species that had flocks so large that they went on for miles. Market hunting for their feathers caused their extinction early in the 20th century.  

You are right about passenger pigeons but for whatever reason NJ and others group them together with "wild" pigeons.  

If Passenger pigeons don't exist there arent any to shoot.  

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3 hours ago, hvnj said:

I believe banded pigeons are carrier or homing  pigeons. Passenger pigeon refers to an extinct species that had flocks so large that they went on for miles. Market hunting for their feathers caused their extinction early in the 20th century.  

Interesting! I learned something today :)

https://www.audubon.org/magazine/may-june-2014/why-passenger-pigeon-went-extinct

Passenger pigeons are, indeed, an extinct species (not one of those with notes attached to their legs :))

Amazing how fast they went from taking "hours to pass over a single spot, darkening the firmament and rendering normal conversation inaudible" to "by the mid-1890s, wild flock sizes numbered in the dozens rather than the hundreds of millions (or even billions)" to finally extinction in the early 20th century.

Quote

"The flocks were so thick that hunting was easy—even waving a pole at the low-flying birds would kill some."

Quote

"In the intervening years, researchers have agreed that the bird was hunted out of existence, victimized by the fallacy that no amount of exploitation could endanger a creature so abundant."

 

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30 minutes ago, mazzgolf said:

Interesting! I learned something today :)

https://www.audubon.org/magazine/may-june-2014/why-passenger-pigeon-went-extinct

Passenger pigeons are, indeed, an extinct species (not one of those with notes attached to their legs :))

Amazing how fast they went from taking "hours to pass over a single spot, darkening the firmament and rendering normal conversation inaudible" to "by the mid-1890s, wild flock sizes numbered in the dozens rather than the hundreds of millions (or even billions)" to finally extinction in the early 20th century.

 

There is a group of scientists that are trying to revive the species genetically.  Same method that’s being attempted on mammoths. Imagine the delays at Newark airport if one of those flocks flew over. 

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