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Who is guilty of....

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2 minutes ago, Tarhunt said:

My friend and I built alot of wooden stands in our younger days and i remember climbing up in them when they were icy. My stand had a plywood floor and one opening day of 6 day, i climbed up in and almost slipped out. Thank goodness of the railings that we put in. After that, I told my friend that enough is enough and we bought ladder stands after that. We walk passed our old stands and wonder why we did what we did. Pretty scary. 

Used 2x3 anti skid strips like you use on boats.

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13 minutes ago, Bonefreak said:

Here it is.....

Q-Safe by Blindsided huntin company...

https://www.blindedhunting.com/qsafe

Screenshot_20191114-214038_Chrome.jpg

This Q-Safe strap plus the Wingman descending device would definitely be better than the way I just attach to climber portion of summit....guna look into setting this system up for WV next wk

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9 hours ago, tcook8296 said:

The tree was slick and frozen. 

TC, unfortunately you ignored one of the major warnings that the manufacturers mention in their instructions, which is not to climb a slick barked frozen tree, yes you were very lucky indeed. 
Yes, if you step too close to the tree with a Viper you can dislodge the bottom section, which is why you shouldn’t do that, and also why you have the straps holding the sections together, but on an icy tree the top section won’t grip either, and down you go, as you experienced. 

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9 hours ago, hunterbob1 said:

Used 2x3 anti skid strips like you use on boats.

We were not that smart back then. 

  • Haha 1

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9 hours ago, Lunatic said:

So you don’t have a plan because when you look at your climber you can not find any part that could break/fail and make the stand useless for getting down. Ok, just don’t teach this to others 

Lun, what the hell kind of statement is that to make?! Don’t presume you know how and what I teach to students, this is a discussion about increasing the safety of tree stand use, and giving fellow hunters more awareness through our collective experience(s), so they might not have to go through some of the injuries or near death mishaps that many have gone through.  

The idea at hunter Ed class is to give students an awareness of the potential for accidents to happen, and stress the need to wear a safety harness and tether themselves to the tree to avoid severe injury and possibly save their life, in which info mention all the available options including descending devices, But it’s a briefing, it’s not a comprehensive class strictly about tree stand use.
However, I always ask the students if they want more extensive info to see me after the class, which i then get into the next level of safety  which would include further details about descending devices.
Im rarely taken up on my offer unfortunately, which is no surprise given it’s hard enough to get experienced hunters to take proper safety precautions, never mind a kid or young adult who feel invincible, to wear proper safety gear.  
 

 I guess to “your point” about anything can fail, how about the descending device you use, ever look at that and wonder if it could fail, you have a plan for that?  I’m being facetious of course, but you get my drift here, anything can fail at anytime, you try to plan the best you can to protect yourself, but it’s almost impossible to plan for every potential situation. 

How many students have you taught about tree stand safety?   

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10 hours ago, Tbryant said:

Strap in at the top with a climber and loc on. Ladders I don't strap myself in. A lot of times while strapped in my harness gets in the way of drawing so I'll usually unstrap for the draw and shot. Also extremely guilty for usually not wearing a harness when hanging sticks and stands during a hang and hunt. 

TB, I mentioned earlier i didn’t want to beat anyone up, but in the interest of safety, and possibly saving your life, you are the quintessential example of a “disaster working to happen!”

Wish i had a buck for every time I’ve heard guys say “the strap is in my way when I draw!” You can adjust it properly so it’s not in your way, you just have to make the effort. 

You unstrap yourself for the shot?😩

As the topic of this post by the OP was an “honest description” of our Personal safety measures, I would urge you to review yours TB, and give an honest re-evaluation of your process before it’s too late buddy. 
 

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3 hours ago, Pathman said:

Lun, what the hell kind of statement is that to make?! Don’t presume you know how and what I teach to students, this is a discussion about increasing the safety of tree stand use, and giving fellow hunters more awareness through our collective experience(s), so they might not have to go through some of the injuries or near death mishaps that many have gone through.  

The idea at hunter Ed class is to give students an awareness of the potential for accidents to happen, and stress the need to wear a safety harness and tether themselves to the tree to avoid severe injury and possibly save their life, in which info mention all the available options including descending devices, But it’s a briefing, it’s not a comprehensive class strictly about tree stand use.
However, I always ask the students if they want more extensive info to see me after the class, which i then get into the next level of safety  which would include further details about descending devices.
Im rarely taken up on my offer unfortunately, which is no surprise given it’s hard enough to get experienced hunters to take proper safety precautions, never mind a kid or young adult who feel invincible, to wear proper safety gear.  
 

 I guess to “your point” about anything can fail, how about the descending device you use, ever look at that and wonder if it could fail, you have a plan for that?  I’m being facetious of course, but you get my drift here, anything can fail at anytime, you try to plan the best you can to protect yourself, but it’s almost impossible to plan for every potential situation. 

How many students have you taught about tree stand safety?   

This really should not be an argument but discussion.
If you don't have a plan how to come down once your climber failed,and you are hanging in your harness then you are almost as bad as not having the harness on. If you can not get back up to your climber, which is very difficult,  you have 5 minutes before lights are out and then you die. The pressure release strap is not the answer because if you tried it under controlled circumstances you would realize it maybe impossible to do 20 feet up under stress and maybe injured or in shock, or both. In case of a climber, this plan is not " we can't prepp for every single possibility".  You strap to the tree to save your life so having a plan on what to do once you are hanging in your harness is essential. Not a big problem using climbing sticks but a real problem in a climber.

Edited by Lunatic

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Lock ons it’s ground to stand. Ladders - when I get in stand. One old perm stand that is pretty high I also have safety line so it’s ground to stand.   Climber not until I am in my set position. There are pros and cons to that 

Edited by JHbowhunter
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Couldn't tie into anything when I used to cut off the top of small cedars and stand as the top of the tree.  Tied in sometimes when I used to stand on tree limbs.  That was only to steady myself when leaning out away from the tree. Wasn't in a ladder stand to much, but didn't tie in anytime.  Lock ons I only tied in when up.  Once again so I could lean out and have the rope hold me back.  I'd tie in with the climber when I got up.  Wasn't until I took a 20" drop with the stand that I got a harness and tied in with a tree rope from the ground up.  I don't bother with a harness anymore, now that I'm on the ground.

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1 hour ago, Pathman said:

TB, I mentioned earlier i didn’t want to beat anyone up, but in the interest of safety, and possibly saving your life, you are the quintessential example of a “disaster working to happen!”

Wish i had a buck for every time I’ve heard guys say “the strap is in my way when I draw!” You can adjust it properly so it’s not in your way, you just have to make the effort. 

You unstrap yourself for the shot?😩

As the topic of this post by the OP was an “honest description” of our Personal safety measures, I would urge you to review yours TB, and give an honest re-evaluation of your process before it’s too late buddy. 
 

No hard feelings, I've come to understand you're a huge advocate for safety. I on the other hand don't live in a world where I cover myself in bubble wrap. Might sound ignorant, but taking my harness off for 30 seconds to get a shot off 99.9% of the time isn't going to kill me. Could it? Sure. I could also die hanging from my harness 20 ft up if the stand failed. To each their own...

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Amazing 25 years ago I never would use a harness at all, I think it was common back then. I only hunt from portables and strap in at base of tree and disconect at base when I climb down. 

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I use ladders and have added lifelines to all but 1 short one this year. When I’m initially setting up there’s nothing which is scary but I always have someone foot the ladder.

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This year my friend gave me that safety line and I have been using it every time. Not sure why I never got it before.

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12 hours ago, tcook8296 said:

The tree was slick and frozen. 

 

:shock: :down:

I put my lineman belt on while I am on the ground. Without it I cannot climb because I use Stepp system with an aider. Once I am up the tree I put the bracket for my M7 on the tree. I then make sure that my lineman belt is over the bracket. I put the stand into the bracket. I loosen my lineman belt enough to climb into the stand and make sure the stand is secure on the tree. I setup my safety strap and hook in. I then remove my lineman belt. 

In all honesty, I believe the lineman belt only provides a certain amount of protection. If I were to slip or fall while climbing I could still slide down the tree, smacking the Stepps on the way down as well. They may slow my fall and the lineman belt would help in that regard as well but I think serious injury can still be sustained.

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At my age and the use of crossbow, I have no need to go any higher than 10 feet....so guilty as charged

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