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LandTrust Updates (cheaper hunts!)

Booking Factors  

20 members have voted

  1. 1. What's the most important factor you consider when booking a hunt?

    • Price
      14
    • Being able to hunt with friends
      1
    • Distance of the property from my house
      5


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Hey gang-

Over the past 2 weeks since we launched LandTrust (like Airbnb for booking hunting trips on private land) we've spoken with a lot of you, and hunters all over the country, and are starting to incorporate your feedback. The main feedback we've heard is around pricing. 

As with any new market, we're trying to figure out with our Landowners what pricing should look like and in that effort, we're working with our NJ/NY properties (click here to see them: http://bit.ly/nynjlistings) to test out a couple things:

  1. Pricing for the properties will be per day for up to 2 hunters. This immediately makes the hunt more fun because you can bring your buddy and twice as affordable since you're splitting the cost with your buddy. Now a deer factory like Odowd Farm West is only $87/day if you split it with your hunting partner!
  2. Discounts for longer bookings. If you'd like to book a property for a week or longer, Landowners will generally be happy to offer discounted rates. 
  3. Messaging with Landowners before making booking requests. We know there are questions you may have for the Landowners before you're ready to pull the trigger on booking a hunt so we've now enabled you to make Enquiries before you make a booking request. 

We've already had hunters in multiple states go on their first LandTrust hunts (myself included!) who've really enjoyed them and we're looking forward to many more of you getting out in the field through LandTrust. 

As always, we want your feedback (good/bad/ugly) so we can make the product & experience better for you. Comment in the thread or feel free to text us at 406.300.5755 with any questions/comments/feedback and sign up for LandTrust today if you haven't already!

 

Nic

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Was looking yesterday  at the property.  I see a lot of them say more for buck  then doe I thought you where booking the property  it is like a trophy fee .still prices are pretty cheap if I had more time I would book one to try out.

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Just now, Mixbaghunter said:

Was looking yesterday  at the property.  I see a lot of them say more for buck  then doe I thought you where booking the property  it is like a trophy fee .still prices are pretty cheap if I had more time I would book one to try out.

Great point, we've heard that too and are working on a simpler pricing structure that would simply say 'deer hunt $125/day' which you could take buck/doe. It's not supposed to be a trophy fee but we totally understand how that looks. The initial goal for that type of pricing feature was for landowners who say only want to allow doe hunts. But we've heard from quite a few folks it seems more like a trophy fee. 

Thanks for the feedback and we all need to make more time to hunt! I have a 10 week old baby girl and totally understand the time crunch, but still trying to get out a morning or two every couple weeks.

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How about trapping  do you think some of the land owner would let guys trap the property.  You could lease for a few days trap and leave 

 

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This pay to hunt is getting out of control, this will most likely be taking property away from guys that bang on doors and get places to hunt with a little labor and a hand shake. JMO

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1 hour ago, Mixbaghunter said:

How about trapping  do you think some of the land owner would let guys trap the property.  You could lease for a few days trap and leave 

 

That's a great idea, I'd imagine each landowner would have their own take on it but I'm sure some of them would be for it.

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55 minutes ago, bucky said:

This pay to hunt is getting out of control, this will most likely be taking property away from guys that bang on doors and get places to hunt with a little labor and a hand shake. JMO

Thanks for the feedback. Generally what we've found over the past few months of talking to hundreds of landowners in 30+ states is that the landowners who want to let anyone come hunt their land will continue to do so, and we're all for that. We want more access for hunting and fishing, not less.

The landowners that sign up for LandTrust, generally speaking, are landowners who are not allowing access because knocking on doors is not something they want to deal with or something they've been burned with in the past. It's important to keep in mind that a lot of these landowners are hardworking farmers, ranchers and otherwise and although you knocking on their door seems like a quick interaction to you, during hunting season that can happen 5x/day starting before the sunrises, which is very disruptive. Additionally, a lot of those same landowners aren't wealthy, they're working to make ends meet. 'Land rich & cash poor' is the saying. So LandTrust offers them a simple, safe, easy way to help monetize their most valuable asset, their land, to help pay for things like taxes, equipment, improvements, etc. To that point, we should want landowners to be able to maintain their farms, ranches, and undeveloped land because if they can't make ends meet, subdivisions begin creeping in and that land will never be hunted again by anyone. 

We hope that hunters understand our goal is to open more access to more hunters. Yes, that access will be paid for because there are costs associated with allowing anyone to access land whether it be time or other resources and because helping landowners pay for maintaining their land and the wildlife we all enjoy on it is a good thing for the longevity of hunting & fishing.

 

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How exactly does this help the average hunter? I see you and your organization benefiting, but how exactly is this opening this up to other hunters and actually benefiting hunting and hunters?

I am all for making a profit but they way you're talking is if you are doing someone like me a favor. If I go to knock on a door and the owner is a land trust signee and I get him to allow me to hunt the property how does that work?

I mean you shouldn't be inhibiting me from hunting this property because you know you're trying to help out hunters and hunting right?

Edited by MZ7Extreme
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$87 bucks to take my boy out on a nice piece of property isn't that bad.....but this pay to hunt thing is getting out of hand n leaves a bad taste in most mouths....used to be a handshake and work some farm chores or leave some roasts, Apple pies, etc

Appreciate your effort, but my family and the kind of blue collar hunters we associate with probably won't ever use your product.....mite have better luck targeting interest in new hunters/city people jumping on the popular "get your own protein" bandwagon and looking for early success and who can pay $

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I agree with not liking the pay to hunt idea, but I also see the benefits to it.  Look at how many people are constantly looking for land to hunt. The common answer is theres plenty of state land, but go deep.  With todays grind, it is hard to get out and scout, this makes it easier for those people.  Think about bear hunting in jersey. If a bunch of these farms are loaded with bear, I am sure a bunch of guys not from north Jersey would jump on it. 

 

Theres good and bad, but I am not faulting the guy for trying to make money.  

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3 hours ago, bucky said:

This pay to hunt is getting out of control, this will most likely be taking property away from guys that bang on doors and get places to hunt with a little labor and a hand shake. JMO

I agree also its gonna jack up the cost of leasing land witch is already nuts

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Additionally, a lot of those same landowners aren't wealthy, they're working to make ends meet. 'Land rich & cash poor' is the saying. So LandTrust offers them a simple, safe, easy way to help monetize their most valuable asset, their land, to help pay for things like taxes, equipment, improvements, etc. To that point, we should want landowners to be able to maintain their farms, ranches, and undeveloped land because if they can't make ends meet, subdivisions begin creeping in and that land will never be hunted again by anyone. 

Nice logic, but not buying it, in our area the farmers are aging and the next generation wants nothing to do with farming because there is no money in it, once they pass on the farms are sold for preservation or development, so there are no saviors in the end. In 20 years people in NJ wont even know what a bean or cornfield looks like:-(

 

Quote

Messaging with Landowners before making booking requests. We know there are questions you may have for the Landowners before you're ready to pull the trigger on booking a hunt so we've now enabled you to make Enquiries before you make a booking request. 

So what above makes you think that will be less disruptive than knocking on a door and getting to know someone that's willing to give you a hand when needed? The farmers I know don't text, enjoy talking on the phone or like people on their property they don't know which it will be in your case...I think your statement below is a bunch of bull also...lmao

Quote

The landowners that sign up for LandTrust, generally speaking, are landowners who are not allowing access because knocking on doors is not something they want to deal with or something they've been burned with in the past. It's important to keep in mind that a lot of these landowners are hardworking farmers, ranchers and otherwise and although you knocking on their door seems like a quick interaction to you, during hunting season that can happen 5x/day starting before the sunrises, which is very disruptive.

Edited by bucky

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9 hours ago, bucky said:

Nice logic, but not buying it, in our area the farmers are aging and the next generation wants nothing to do with farming because there is no money in it, once they pass on the farms are sold for preservation or development, so there are no saviors in the end. In 20 years people in NJ wont even know what a bean or cornfield looks like:-(

 

So what above makes you think that will be less disruptive than knocking on a door and getting to know someone that's willing to give you a hand when needed? The farmers I know don't text, enjoy talking on the phone or like people on their property they don't know which it will be in your case...I think your statement below is a bunch of bull also...lmao

Hunting private land has absolutely changed from a generation ago and as a company that's been alive for ~2 weeks, I don't believe we're responsible for that change. Nor would I even build it if we were all getting private land hunting access whenever we wanted. We're building LandTrust precisely because it's changed and we're trying to make it easier to connect the dots to hunt private land for those who want to pay for the opportunity. If you don't there's always public, which I hunt often too.

I've been 'door knocking' (phone/text/email/physically) and having conversations with literally hundreds and hundreds of landowners from across the country which have led me here. If these weren't the things I was hearing from them, it would be a mistake to build a business around it. 

I too thought that they wouldn't want to text/email/mess around with the internet but you'd be surprised at how tech savvy they are and how many times I hear a 65yr old+ farmer say, 'my wife has been doing Airbnb for our place...' and love the idea. 

Also, a funny sidenote is the landowner in NJ who's listed his properties is in his mid-30's and left his old job to come back and farm with his dad. 

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11 hours ago, smittty said:

I agree also its gonna jack up the cost of leasing land witch is already nuts

Leasing is super expensive, I can't afford to slap down thousands of dollars just for a hunting spot.

That's precisely why we're building LandTrust. Although a lot of us can't afford a $5-$10k+ annual hunting lease, we can afford to pay hundreds of dollars to hunt for a week somewhere. Essentially we're helping to remove the upfront annual cost of hunting private land leases and make it more of a 'pay-as-you-go' model which opens it to many more of us. I understand not all of us, but many more.

I just hunted an 18k+ acre ranch and paid $100 for me and a buddy to hunt pheasant on opening morning. It was pretty cool and something I would have never had the opportunity to do without LandTrust.

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11 hours ago, allmann said:

I agree with not liking the pay to hunt idea, but I also see the benefits to it.  Look at how many people are constantly looking for land to hunt. The common answer is theres plenty of state land, but go deep.  With todays grind, it is hard to get out and scout, this makes it easier for those people.  Think about bear hunting in jersey. If a bunch of these farms are loaded with bear, I am sure a bunch of guys not from north Jersey would jump on it. 

 

Theres good and bad, but I am not faulting the guy for trying to make money.  

Appreciate the comment. Btw- we're all for public land and the different public access programs on private lands, we're simply filling in the space around that with landowners who don't participate in those programs. We're simply trying to make it easier for more people to get out and hunt.

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