Jump to content
Bucksnbows

Burnt Mills Dam Removal on Lamington

Recommended Posts

My firm Trout Scapes River Restoration was hired to remove the remnant concrete dam on the lower Lamington River between Branchburg and Bedminster to improve anadromous fish passage and habitat.  We begin mobilizing next week and work begins on the project on Saturday, October 12.  We anticipate about a 10 day project with two excavators working.  One of those machines will be run by our own Heavyop who gets the fun job, among others, of hydraulically hammering out the concrete section.  This is a federally funded project, and our client is Raritan Headwaters Association, the watershed organization that works to protect and restore the South Branch River and North Branch River from their headwaters down to where those two rivers meet to form the Raritan River which leads to the Raritan Bay.  

If you trout fish after the fall stocking downstream, we may have the water off-color at times during that period.  But it will only be a few days here and there.  Come by if you want to see the progress, but note that parking is fairly limited.

 

IMG_0642.JPG

IMG_0659.JPG

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I didn't think that old dam really restricted any upstream travel . Always a nice pool there.

Always enjoy the information !:up:

Edited by Mink
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Mink said:

I didn't think that old dam really restricted any upstream travel . Always a nice pool there.

BNB - I love seeing these posts. Looking at the image, it looks like the river has already found its way around the remaining structure. So how can you improve this other than straighten the river and how do you expect this to improve passage?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Mink said:

I didn't think that old dam really restricted any upstream travel . Always a nice pool there.

Always enjoy the information !:up:

 

15 minutes ago, Integracingsr said:

BNB - I love seeing these posts. Looking at the image, it looks like the river has already found its way around the remaining structure. So how can you improve this other than straighten the river and how do you expect this to improve passage?

The river breached its earthen dam back in the late 50s during a hurricane event.  Ever since, it has cause lots of sediment to enter the river as it continues to eat away at the left bank in that channel along Milnor Road in what was once woods.  The original river channel is behind the dam on the opposite side, and that is the side we will put the flows back to.  The "new channel" created in the late 50s by the hurricane will be blocked off in all but the highest of flows.  There are also several species of freshwater mussels below the dam that could get wiped out when this dam finally fails completely.  Concrete does not get better with age, and this dam is well over 100 years past its useful life.  That is the main reason it is being removed, to get it out before Mother Nature does and destroys mussel beds downstream and overall fish habitat.  But it is also designed to maximize anadromous fish passage in all flows beyond the dam for striped bass, river herring, American eels, and American shad.  Those species are now benefiting from dam removals downstream on the mainstem Raritan River.  This is a continuation of those earlier efforts.    

Additionally, we are adding a vernal pool, several "slit trenches" to direct flood waters into the intact WRP (wetlands reserve program) lands that surround the site on the Bedminster side, and lowering a bank to gain improved floodplain access.  All of this will benefit fish, birds such as eagles and ospreys that eat fish, macro invertebrates, drinking water quality, and freshwater mussels which are disappearing at an alarming rate in most US waters and which play a critical role in filtering the water.   

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Haskell_Hunter said:

If we stop by to inspect your work, are cigars and single malts provided to the spectators?

Assuming you are bringing both, the answer is yes.  :) 

 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 5
  • Winner 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

any plans on removing the other dam on the north branch. by the route 202 bridge. and what about duke island dam. thats a bigger one

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, hunterbob1 said:

That was quick,proposal began march of this year.

Limited parking?Will your equipment be in the parking lot?

Neat history.  https://www.raritanheadwaters.org/preserves-map-page/burnt-mills-flood-plain/

We have been involved nearly 4 years on this project.  The March proposal was for construction of the plans we developed with a US Fish & Wildlife fish passage engineer out of that agency's offices in Massachusetts.  This project has taken a long time for a variety of reasons, but we are fully permitted and ready to rock.

I'm bringing in wood timber mats to park on and to haul boulders to the river on.  Both excavators will park on the mats at night and for refueling.  We will park along Milnor Road once we have contacted Bedminster PD to confirm access.  Both the town and county have been great to work with.  We even have NJ Water Supply Authority on call to reduce or raise flows out of Spruce Run into Rockaway Creek if we need help there since they are lowering Spruce Run for dam repairs.  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Kype said:

any plans on removing the other dam on the north branch. by the route 202 bridge. and what about duke island dam. thats a bigger one

This is the only dam removal we are involved with on the Lamington or North Branch currently.  We are working on removals on Spruce Run Creek and the South Branch Raritan, but one is next spring and the other likely 2021, respectively.  I do know that there are others working on the Duke Island weir, but I don't know its status.  It's great to see NJ embrace dam removals and then seeing anadromous fish return each time the very next spring.  The lower Paulinskill should one day become a decent shad fishery although it is currently closed to that species as are all tributaries in NJ to the Delaware River.  We need to bring back our herring which are a critical component of the ocean food chain.  We are staring down a NJ striped bass closure next spring, and the more fish we can spawn and feed, the better when it comes to predator species like bass.   

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Bucksnbows said:

My firm was hired to improve anadromous fish passage and habitat. 

You're catadromousphobic.  I'm offended.  

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Rusty said:

You're catadromousphobic.  I'm offended.  

Only the American eels are catadromous, the others anadromous.  Look at us two biology geeks :nerd::cheers:

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...