Jump to content
toxo

We own the tree's!

Recommended Posts

Yesterday we posted our club property. We have a large corn field but no woods around it,just the tree line,property line. A member had a note on his tree stand from the adjacent Club to remove it because the note said that THEY own the trees on the property line!   After 54 years of Hunting I'm ready to give it up,its NO longer like it was guys! SCUMBAGS! :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a farm that got split up like that.

when it went up for sale the neighbors bought the tree lines and 5 foot of every field.

only place we could hunt moving forward was the fields them selves out of blinds.

still did very well by not over pressuring the deer there.

.

If they own the tree line  you should expect they don’t want you on it.

  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But a tree line IS the property boundary,no? Like a fence. How can one side or the other say that they own the trees?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, toxo said:

But a tree line IS the property boundary,no? Like a fence. How can one side or the other say that they own the trees?

Not always .

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You put your stand facing one way, they put their facing the their. Then you’ll have someone to talk to on those slow mornings  👍. Or at the very least it’s someone you can have friendly competition with throughout the year 😁

  • Like 1
  • Haha 6
  • Winner 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have a surveyor locate the trees and plot on map to show which ones are on your property, on their property and which ones are common. If the property line does truly go down the tree row , most are probably common trees but I seen many times where people creat subdivisions by locating the end of tree rows and creating a straight boundary when the tree row actually bends a bit so the majority of the trees in the middle end up on one property.

Or go buy a tripod stand and put it next to the tree row

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, rgw said:

Have a surveyor locate the trees and plot on map to show which ones are on your property, on their property and which ones are common. If the property line does truly go down the tree row , most are probably common trees but I seen many times where people creat subdivisions by locating the end of tree rows and creating a straight boundary when the tree row actually bends a bit so the majority of the trees in the middle end up on one property.

Or go buy a tripod stand and put it next to the tree row

The problem with a ground blind or a tripod is you KNOW that it will disappear when he is not there. Just pisses me off,years ago it was never like this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While the tree line very well may have been the property boundary at one time, watch for creeping tree lines like we have on our NY hunting camp land.  Over many decades, the trees have slowly grown out into our field, making the first two or so rows of trees actually on our property as the Hunt Stand photo shows.   In our case as you can see, we have a stand in that tree line, but we also have permission from the landowner of that woodlot to hunt there, so all is good. IMO, no hunter has the right to set a stand or blind on a property line unless it is facing towards their land and not towards their neighbor's land without express consent by the other landowner.  This practice has cause more fights between hunters than most others.

 

Tree line encroachment.jpg

Edited by Bucksnbows
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many farms ive hunted, my farmers owned the fields only.  Have it surveyed to know exactly who owns what.  If it is in fact their property, i would be placing a note on that tree also.  Ownership is black and white.  If it is their property, i would advise them that no deer is to be shot into your field which seems to be common practice of property line hunters!  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Gobblengrunt said:

Many farms ive hunted, my farmers owned the fields only.  Have it surveyed to know exactly who owns what.  If it is in fact their property, i would be placing a note on that tree also.  Ownership is black and white.  If it is their property, i would advise them that no deer is to be shot into your field which seems to be common practice of property line hunters!  

NJ's free online tax maps will show you survey lines.  If you disagree with them, then pay a licensed surveyor to survey it for you.  Chances are, the lines will be correct on the state site.  NJ is the best mapped out state in the nation.  And all the info is free on their GIS site and others.   

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is one reason why I avoid this kind of situation. Another reason is A guy I know leased property in Maryland mostly field and about 15 -20 yards of woods every night the hunters on the other side shot 50 yards or so in in the end he never killed anything . Had many nice bucks on camera entering field once season started the bucks  slowly disappeared and doe numbers dropped .. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, toxo said:

But a tree line IS the property boundary,no? Like a fence. How can one side or the other say that they own the trees?

A line is a line. It could be on either side of a tree or even in the middle. Before you do anything you should know exactly where the line is. Maybe is on the other side and the guy is just blowing smoke UYA.

  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Gobblengrunt said:

Many farms ive hunted, my farmers owned the fields only.  Have it surveyed to know exactly who owns what.  If it is in fact their property, i would be placing a note on that tree also.  Ownership is black and white.  If it is their property, i would advise them that no deer is to be shot into your field which seems to be common practice of property line hunters!  

You are 100% right, knowing where it is is a key.

However I would not be putting that note on my tree unless my neighbor was an AH giving me a hard time. I have this situation on a property in Cream ridge and I have no problem someone hunting the line. It goes both ways so benefit is mutual.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...