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Big Blue

Recommendations needed for bow hunting clothes and Boots???

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I'm a huge fan of fleece. As a base layer,, merlino wool. And a wind breaker layer. 

You get what you pay for. With quality clothing,only need 3 layers. Shop at Dick's, you'll be cold. 

Boots is Cabela's Saskatchewan, or for regular NJ weather,, Irish Setter Buck tracker boots. They like slippers

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I’m a huge fan of Sitka gear. Yes it’s expensive but through my experience, it is the by far the best quality and best thought out gear there is. If the funds are limited, I also use the Cabelas MTO50 one piece cover all. It’s also incredible. I’m not sure that it’s still being made but if so, it’s fantastic. As others stated, what you wear underneath is just as or even more important than what you wear on the outside. I’m a huge fan of merino wool. Even if you sweat, it still insulates and dries quickly. I don’t care how cold it gets outside, while walking to my stand, I always have all of my vents and or zippers open to help me from overheating. On the subject of footwear, I always wear liner socks under my my merino wool over the calf socks. They are extremely thin but make a world of difference. I have tried a ton of boots but after tons of research, I tried Baffin Apex boots. Incredible!!! Those Canadians make a great boot.


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Get a quality, insulated, one piece suit.  Layer anything under it.  I use old heavy knit sweaters that hold in warm air between layers of sweatshirts, and cut the sleeves off.  Don't need the bulk or that much insulation in the arms.  Vests make good layers.  Nothing is going to be warmer on the feet than a good pack boot.  I have light weight caribou's for temps in the 30's, mid weight sorels for 20's, and the cabelas iditarod(now called alaskan II) for temps in the teens to the -teens.  Harder to walk in those, but I did get used to them.  Have to keep the head, fingers, and toes warm or the rest won't be of much help.

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If keeping warm is the issue, try a Summit Heated seat.  I bought one last year.  I highly recommend it.  A toasty warm ass on a cold day is not to be underrated.  It lasts about 4 hours on the high setting; 12 on the low with the included battery pack.  Carry an extra battery with you for all day sits.  They're down to about $50 right now on Amazon. 

The only problem is that there are a lot of bad seats out there.   I sent 2 defective ones back before getting one that worked properly.  Summit support was great though.

Edited by barrike

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On 9/2/2019 at 12:12 PM, Big Blue said:

Ive bow hunting for 30 years... Still looking for the perfect set of boots and clothing..... I have all the scent Lok crap doesn't keep you warm enough....Sitka worth the money??? Any other brands or recommendations would be appreciated..... On those Cold November days for all day sits 🦌🦌🦌🦌

Sitka gear is worth it if you can afford it - also look into first lite. You get what you pay for. First lite has some of the best merino wool on the market. Merino wool is great for all seasons. If you look on camofire or black ovis, you’ll find deals on all kinds of gear. 

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Keep your heat in!

The IWOM jacket/suit Thinsulate insulation worked great for me last season. Rifle season in the Poconos to winter bow, the IWOM garment was suitable for all. Too hot, no problem, just unzip. Feet are cold, put them inside too. Handwarmer: covered, pockets covered, play with your phone in the kangaroo pocket.

Put your fall restraint lanyard through a hole in the back of the jacket. I can't say that IWOM missed a feature with this product.

Edited by BCsaw

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On 9/2/2019 at 5:39 PM, birddogger said:

I suggest that you pay ,most attention to the two opposite ends of your body, head and feet.

A good hard hat cap liner can keep a good deal of your heat from escaping out the top.  In truly frigid weather I have been comfortable with a knit facemask stocking cap over a cap liner. 

As far as feet are concerned, in truly frigid conditions, UI suggest you consider taking two pair of boots into the woods...one to walk in and another, more heavily insulated, to change into and sit after you have cooled down from your walk in.  Sweat will chill you to the bone, real quick.   I liked to have a pair of thin nylon dress socks to put on as a base layer over good wool socks.  If your manhood is secure, you should consider using kneehigh womens stockings as they really trap air and keep you warm as a base layer for your feet and lower legs.  They work better than dress socks.

I also suggest that you carry something to stand on which will raise your feet off the ground and insulate them from the cold.  I used a pad that was designed for gardeners to kneel on that was about 3/4" thick flexible foam.   An air cushion for your butt will also keep a significant part of your body out of direct contact with the cold if you are sitting on  stand.

All of this is kinda old school...but it worked for me.  I suspect that, in combination with some of today's miracle fabrics, these strategies should work even better.

 

RayG

 

 

 

 

the idea of insulating your feet from the cold metal stand platform is clever! 

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I bit the bullet and purchased a bunch of Sitka clothing.....found out a friend of mine is on a pro staff and gets 30% off.... Went to a retailer and tried it on.... Stuff seems incredibly well-made extremely warm and very quiet.... Best of luck out there

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On 9/4/2019 at 9:44 AM, VFL said:

Sitka gear is worth it if you can afford it - also look into first lite. You get what you pay for. First lite has some of the best merino wool on the market. Merino wool is great for all seasons. If you look on camofire or black ovis, you’ll find deals on all kinds of gear. 

I really enjoy my first light stuff. Everything from base layers to bibs and jackets have worked for me in some bad weather. 

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