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Midwest private land hunting strategy advice needed


kanigie

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The situation and the set up.

I have 3.5 days to hunt (Oct 25-28) a 200 acre farm in north central Missouri. I've never set foot on the property and I will be the first person to hunt it this year. There has been some light pressure, owner mowing field edges and farmer doing his thing. Fields are planted with corn and soy. Will find out soon if the corn is still standing, I realize that could affect my strategy drastically. I will be staying on the property marked by the blue square. 

I will arrive midday and get a quick tour by ATV from the owner. 10 or so stands are in place, assuming all gun set ups. I'll be bringing my lonewolf stand and sticks. Completely prepared to stickily hang and hunt it if need be. With that said I could respectfully decline the tour in order to not disturb the property as I'm pretty sure I know whats going on. As for the neighbors, no info.

My initial assessment: First day of hunting, an afternoon sit, sit the middle of the property wind permitting and watch the timber/bedding in the west and the creek beds throughout. Use that sit to hopefully confirm my satellite scouting theory. From there get more aggressive hunting pinch points, creek crossings, and outside bedding areas based on what I observed, wind, and time of day. Looking to make the most out of my short time there, for those with experienced in the midwest, what are your thoughts?

billsMO.jpg

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Take the tour with the farmer. Ask him where he  See's them in the morning. Where he sees them at night? 

If/when they spook from his tractor which way do they run? 

Which side if farm property is hunted?(by other land owners)  One side hunted harder then the other? 

I'd hunt the creek bottoms, bucks are gonna be cruising looking for that first piece of ass. 

 

Nick

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Take the tour with the farmer. Ask him where he  See's them in the morning. Where he sees them at night? 
If/when they spook from his tractor which way do they run? 
Which side if farm property is hunted?(by other land owners)  One side hunted harder then the other? 
I'd hunt the creek bottoms, bucks are gonna be cruising looking for that first piece of ass. 
 
Nick


He doesn’t live there. Only stops by every so often. Still, all good points.


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You can do it in 3 days I did my first time in Kansas but the guy I lease from had a couple of stands up and told me what wind to hunt them. Check out those stands and find out if they where put up with wind in mind. Even gun stands are sometimes good for bow hunting. I also would take the tour. The farmer and his machines are not pressure on the deer they are very much used to it. So take the ride on the ATV that will help. Ask tons of questions. Definitely hunt the creek bottoms. Use a weather app my favorite is ScoutLook.  That’s how I would start. You will know better once boots are on the ground. Good luck keep us posted. Sounds exciting 

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First night, find/put a stand that has the best view of the property overall. It looks like it would be very close to the blue dot. As other have said, glass, glass, glass.  Note (write down) everything you see, where it came from, where it went, etc.. You might want to throw in a rattle or two.

Next morning, Go to a stand that will allow you to glass any promising parts of the property that you couldn't see from the night before. Glass, glass, glass.

Find the does, bucks will be there.

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Looking at your aerial pic, that farm looks like it has a lot of fields and a lot of edge. As I said in my earlier post  is to glass the afternoon. That will give you an idea where they are bedding. Dont know where your access point(s) are, but you may find it difficult to get in there in the mornings. If it were me on the first morning, I would wait until after light to go in, glass if I could to see where the deer exit the fields. If you walk into those fields before daylight, you may be blowing the deer out and not only killing your morning but your afternoon. 

Corn should be down as well as beans. Around my farm in Illinois, all the crop is down. I think most areas of the midwest got their corn in early so its out early. Usually they clean up the loose corn on the ground for a couple weeks after harvest. All depends how efficient the combine is. 

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Looking at your aerial pic, that farm looks like it has a lot of fields and a lot of edge. As I said in my earlier post  is to glass the afternoon. That will give you an idea where they are bedding. Dont know where your access point(s) are, but you may find it difficult to get in there in the mornings. If it were me on the first morning, I would wait until after light to go in, glass if I could to see where the deer exit the fields. If you walk into those fields before daylight, you may be blowing the deer out and not only killing your morning but your afternoon. 
Corn should be down as well as beans. Around my farm in Illinois, all the crop is down. I think most areas of the midwest got their corn in early so its out early. Usually they clean up the loose corn on the ground for a couple weeks after harvest. All depends how efficient the combine is. 


Morning access was definitely a concern. Hoping I can sneak up those creek beds. Good idea about waiting until first light though.


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40 minutes ago, tcook8296 said:

Looking at your aerial pic, that farm looks like it has a lot of fields and a lot of edge. As I said in my earlier post  is to glass the afternoon. That will give you an idea where they are bedding. Dont know where your access point(s) are, but you may find it difficult to get in there in the mornings. If it were me on the first morning, I would wait until after light to go in, glass if I could to see where the deer exit the fields. If you walk into those fields before daylight, you may be blowing the deer out and not only killing your morning but your afternoon. 

^^This is great advice. ^^

It's exactly what I did 8 or 9 years ago when I got on a new property in Ohio that was similar to what you have posted. Gave up the first morning hunt to be at a good observation point at first light to see what I could see. Midday was spent scouting small pieces of woods for sign. Walk all the edges you can after the deer have moved off of the fields. You will find spots that have higher concentrations of sign than others, focus there.

First afternoon was spent in a stand on an edge doing the same; observing based on what morning and midday scouting showed. My brother was doing the same so we split up to learn the land quickly (it was 500 acres, so a lot to see). By the third afternoon, we were in deer pretty good and I killed a nice 12 point.  You have to be aggressive after seeing some activity you want to hunt and move right in on it because you only have a few days. If you wait for a perfect wind, or get too picky about getting the perfect tree, you will not be successful. 

On your midday scouting, don't go in too deep. Those woods look thin so scout edges or just inside the field edge. Deer will often bed not far from the field in those small pieces. If you find a good trail or rubs coming out into a field, and sign of deer traveling the edge, set up on that intersection. I would save the creek bottoms for the last day, if the edge hunting plan fails. If you blow the deer out by hunting inside the woods, you're leaving anyway so it doesn't matter. 

Looks like a fun place to hunt, good luck.

I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation UNDER GOD, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

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After reading the rest of the posts, I see many say go into the bottoms. Again, I would wait until the last day or so since you only have 3 or 4 days of hunting. If you know where the deer are bedding and feeding, those are great spots, but you don't. They could be bedded in those small patches between the creeks and the fields, that happens a lot. May go against the grain of what many are saying but I think an "outside in" strategy (start by observing and hunting the edges, work towards the inside as the hunt nears it's end) would work best on small, broken up pieces like that.

If you get there on the 25th, try to hunt in the bottoms on the 26th and blow the deer out, they may not come back until the end of your short hunt. Just something to think about. 

Edited by DV1

I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation UNDER GOD, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

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