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Teeter Hang Ups Inversion Table


yoda4x4

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Long story short... My lower back is a train wreck. Lately I've been contemplating about buying an inversion table; Teeter Hang Ups is the most recognized company. Do any of you back pain sufferers use an inversion table? Which one? And does it help?

 

David

 

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I used mine for years. It deff keeps you feeling better .And it's great for stretching on which also helps keep your back loose.

Used to do 100 inverted sit ups on it every morning to keep core tight which also helps allot.

 

Captain Dan Bias

REELMUSIC SPORTFISHING

50# Striper live release club.

 

http://reelmusicsportfishing.blogspot.com/

 

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I will start by saying see if you can try someone's table instead of laying out the cash because if it makes you feel better, then hey, it makes you feel better, regardless of whether it is placebo (which may be bc it is all mental anyway...)

However, my actual opinion is that they are BS. Like TheGreek said, you are only relieving the spine of compression for a very short period of time and then it just compresses again. You aren't going to fix 16 hours of compression a day by hanging upside down for 20 minutes a few times a week (or even every day). Really what you need to do is figure out if you actually have back pain and not psychosomatic symptoms Google Dr Sarno, https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/psychology-low-back-pain-201604259537 

Once you figure that out you can then develop a plan. Usually the best route is to strengthen the core, perhaps do some yoga. Stretching and what not is nonsense and won't do anything for you. In order to fix issues of these sorts you typically need active stimulation of the muscle or affected areas while in positions that combat the issue. For example, most people with low back pain have tight hips because they sit. You can do as many couch stretches as you want but if your hips are already at a certain point of tightness you are just making the issue worse. You need to do exercises that have the hips/psoas etc activated in elongated and proper positions. Even most physical therapists don't understand this, I recently found a DPT that actually does. Unfortunately, he costs and arm and a leg but my hips are a mess from hockey and sitting at a desk 12 hours a day so I am going to dole out the cash.

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I will start by saying see if you can try someone's table instead of laying out the cash because if it makes you feel better, then hey, it makes you feel better, regardless of whether it is placebo (which may be bc it is all mental anyway...)
However, my actual opinion is that they are BS. Like TheGreek said, you are only relieving the spine of compression for a very short period of time and then it just compresses again. You aren't going to fix 16 hours of compression a day by hanging upside down for 20 minutes a few times a week (or even every day). Really what you need to do is figure out if you actually have back pain and not psychosomatic symptoms Google Dr Sarno, https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/psychology-low-back-pain-201604259537 
Once you figure that out you can then develop a plan. Usually the best route is to strengthen the core, perhaps do some yoga. Stretching and what not is nonsense and won't do anything for you. In order to fix issues of these sorts you typically need active stimulation of the muscle or affected areas while in positions that combat the issue. For example, most people with low back pain have tight hips because they sit. You can do as many couch stretches as you want but if your hips are already at a certain point of tightness you are just making the issue worse. You need to do exercises that have the hips/psoas etc activated in elongated and proper positions. Even most physical therapists don't understand this, I recently found a DPT that actually does. Unfortunately, he costs and arm and a leg but my hips are a mess from hockey and sitting at a desk 12 hours a day so I am going to dole out the cash.


If they are a CFMT therapist they are the best. My wife after 7-8 years of continuing ed will be going to get sit for the exam next yr.

Its all Greek to me

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3 hours ago, newjerseyhunter said:

I will start by saying see if you can try someone's table instead of laying out the cash because if it makes you feel better, then hey, it makes you feel better, regardless of whether it is placebo (which may be bc it is all mental anyway...)

However, my actual opinion is that they are BS. Like TheGreek said, you are only relieving the spine of compression for a very short period of time and then it just compresses again. You aren't going to fix 16 hours of compression a day by hanging upside down for 20 minutes a few times a week (or even every day). Really what you need to do is figure out if you actually have back pain and not psychosomatic symptoms Google Dr Sarno, https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/psychology-low-back-pain-201604259537 

Once you figure that out you can then develop a plan. Usually the best route is to strengthen the core, perhaps do some yoga. Stretching and what not is nonsense and won't do anything for you. In order to fix issues of these sorts you typically need active stimulation of the muscle or affected areas while in positions that combat the issue. For example, most people with low back pain have tight hips because they sit. You can do as many couch stretches as you want but if your hips are already at a certain point of tightness you are just making the issue worse. You need to do exercises that have the hips/psoas etc activated in elongated and proper positions. Even most physical therapists don't understand this, I recently found a DPT that actually does. Unfortunately, he costs and arm and a leg but my hips are a mess from hockey and sitting at a desk 12 hours a day so I am going to dole out the cash.

IMO you couldn't be more wrong .

95% of back pain can be relieved by keeping your hamstrings loose. When your back is out and your hips rotate to try and find a pain free spot the hamstring that doesn't stay stretched continues to pull the spine out of alignment .

Finding the area that is tight and keeping it stretched out allows the body to get back to where its supposes to be.

Keeping your core solid is super important when you have back issues..

MANY horseshoers have been using an inversion bench long before they were a fad.

decompressing both your spine , from the weight of your head hanging allows better circulation in that whole area.

It also helps to naturally move the rest of your organs  decompressing everything.

 

I had friends that ate perkasets like skittles until they learned to stay stretched throughout the day.

Starting the day and ending the day on an IB kept me from seeing a chiro a few times a week to one or two times a year..

 

.

 

Captain Dan Bias

REELMUSIC SPORTFISHING

50# Striper live release club.

 

http://reelmusicsportfishing.blogspot.com/

 

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1 hour ago, hammer4reel said:

IMO you couldn't be more wrong .

95% of back pain can be relieved by keeping your hamstrings loose. When your back is out and your hips rotate to try and find a pain free spot the hamstring that doesn't stay stretched continues to pull the spine out of alignment .

Finding the area that is tight and keeping it stretched out allows the body to get back to where its supposes to be.

Keeping your core solid is super important when you have back issues..

MANY horseshoers have been using an inversion bench long before they were a fad.

decompressing both your spine , from the weight of your head hanging allows better circulation in that whole area.

It also helps to naturally move the rest of your organs  decompressing everything.

 

I had friends that ate perkasets like skittles until they learned to stay stretched throughout the day.

Starting the day and ending the day on an IB kept me from seeing a chiro a few times a week to one or two times a year..

 

.

 

I agree, to say "stretching is nonsense" is nonsense.

 

 

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I have been using an inversion table for over a decade and the benefits of decompression are definitely real but it's not a stand alone miracle worker. Like Hammer and others have said stretching routinely (especially hamstrings) is extremely important in a daily regimen. One additional thing completes the trifecta for relief and that's hydration. Drink plenty of water daily along with the table and stretching and I guarantee you see vast improvement of your back issues.

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I will tell you that the inversion table ( i have one) is strictly to get you out of pain. I to have herniated disc in lower back along with spinal stenosis. I also have no disc at C5/C6.

The table will help improve your immediate discomfort, but long term you need some kind of P/T, either on your own or professionally. I've incorporated strengthening and stretching exercises to keep things in check. I also have been doing Tai Chi and Qigong for years and they help immensely with my back. 

I bought my table on Amazon years ago. I just went with one that had top ratings.

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Anecdotal evidence aside stretching does nothing to lengthen muscles, it just isn't the way it works. Now maybe stretching will help soothe your central nervous system a bit since that is actually what is controlling your ability to "stretch". So in effect the relaxing effect of just doing the stretching is helping you a bit but the same can be accomplished by meditation or anesthesia 😂 and this actually goes back to how much of the pain is in your head. I'm serious, watch that Sarno video.

Generally speaking muscles tighten for a few reasons 1. To compensate for weaker muscles 2. Because of accommodation 3 overuse injuries 4 anxiety

The bottom line, for true rehab you need to get to know your sarcomeres amd stretching ain't gonna do it. You need activation of those muscles. First step would be to get out of your chair if you sit in one all day. Get a desk that allows you to alternate standing and sitting. Work your core,  yoga, pilates all good for activating the muscles you need to activate. 

Your best bet, seek out a really good DPT for an evaluation. 

 

 

 

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