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any thoughts on pex tubing


buckhound

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Use the stainless pinch crimp rings rather than the annealed copper crimp rings. Also stay away from the push-fit sharkbite fittings. Those are for emergency repairs only IMHO. 35+ years of residential and commercial plumbing experience behind these opinions. Personally I would use 'L' copper in my house but that's just me being 'old-school'.

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Use the stainless pinch crimp rings rather than the annealed copper crimp rings. Also stay away from the push-fit sharkbite fittings. Those are for emergency repairs only IMHO. 35+ years of residential and commercial plumbing experience behind these opinions. Personally I would use 'L' copper in my house but that's just me being 'old-school'.

I agree with above, type L copper. Pex is cheap and easy but definitely not my first choice.


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AWM

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Some on here are VERY skilled in their craft so I will defer to them with experience and technical info but will share my experiences as well.

We used pex for a few different apartment complexes that were eating through copper at a ridiculous rate and had 100's of thousands$$$ on testing and treating. Years on end and well before I started working at/for these places. We had run miles of pex(sharkbites and crimps) back in 2005/20006-ish. Up to 3" pipe. I have a different job now but still help others with installs when they reach out to me.

I use sharkbites. I like them and they hold. I personally have not run into one issue with them. Not sure why some are against them, but always willing to learn and hear past experiences. I dont think things are black and white, generally, so just because I have not had issues, Im sure others may have.

I like the crimps too. 

The sharbite fittings are huge especially once you start increasing pipe size...not talking about 1/2 - 3/4" fittings. Anytime you have to go through a wall see if you can give yourself some wiggle room on either side. You dont want to push the fitting right against - thats a no-no. You need to think of access first before you cut and think of your connection. Simple but easy to forget if you dont do it all of the time.

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10 hours ago, Dave B. said:

Use the stainless pinch crimp rings rather than the annealed copper crimp rings. Also stay away from the push-fit sharkbite fittings. Those are for emergency repairs only IMHO. 35+ years of residential and commercial plumbing experience behind these opinions. Personally I would use 'L' copper in my house but that's just me being 'old-school'.

 

3 hours ago, maximus66 said:


I agree with above, type L copper. Pex is cheap and easy but definitely not my first choice.


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any specific reason other than personal choice you prefer copper ? honestly if money was no issue i would just use copper ...

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42 minutes ago, buckhound said:

 

any specific reason other than personal choice you prefer copper ? honestly if money was no issue i would just use copper ...

When money is no issue go with Copper and Pro press fittings, pex is just fine.  Just get a good tool with a check gauge and set it up correct.  Also perform an overnight pressure test on it before covering any walls.  Make sure you use nailer plates when applicable. 

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any specific reason other than personal choice you prefer copper ? honestly if money was no issue i would just use copper ...

Yes, i have done many repairs from the use of pex from drywall nails piercing it to people snaking wires, getting the snake caught on it creating a leak to mention a few. With new construction it is usually fastened to the framing correctly but you’d be surprised during renovations how it is installed since it has a bit of “snakability” and can be somewhat radiused through tough spots only to lie just beneath the drywall or subfloor just waiting for a weekend warrior homeowner LOL


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AWM

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11 minutes ago, buckhound said:

any idea what tool with the check gauge is good ?do the pro press tools work with pex?

Usually a good crimper will have a check gauge to ensure that you are crimping correctly.  Pro Press is used with copper, my plumbers will use Pex, Copper, Sweat/Propress depending on the job and specs.  As mentioned above when you need to bend it use the radius brackets.   

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Been using pex pretty extensively for about the past 10 to 12 years. Sure I would rather use copper but if you want to compete you have to use pex.
I've used allot of different systems over the years before settling with uponor (formerly wirsbo) Which imo is the best system. Uponor doesn't use crimp rings. It uses plastic expansion rings. Then the ring and pipe are expanded and the fittings are inserted. There have been some issues with the crimp rings breaking not so much the crush type (they have their own installation issues) but the stainless pinch rings seem to be a problem at times. Another advantage to uponor is the fittings are pretty close to nominal pipe size. As where in crimp systems the fittings are one pipe size smaller. The draw back to uponor from a home owner stand point would be the investment into tool. Which is rather pricey

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4 hours ago, bill43 said:

Been using pex pretty extensively for about the past 10 to 12 years. Sure I would rather use copper but if you want to compete you have to use pex.
I've used allot of different systems over the years before settling with uponor (formerly wirsbo) Which imo is the best system. Uponor doesn't use crimp rings. It uses plastic expansion rings. Then the ring and pipe are expanded and the fittings are inserted. There have been some issues with the crimp rings breaking not so much the crush type (they have their own installation issues) but the stainless pinch rings seem to be a problem at times. Another advantage to uponor is the fittings are pretty close to nominal pipe size. As where in crimp systems the fittings are one pipe size smaller. The draw back to uponor from a home owner stand point would be the investment into tool. Which is rather pricey

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Uponor is also nice if making connections in tight spaces as you don't need to fit the crimp tool in there, you can expand the tube where you have more room and then make connection in tight spots.  The Uponor PEX is also more flexible than some brands, although more expensive too.

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