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The first thing you should do is decide whether your looking for a pointing or flushing breed. Then decide how you like to hunt. Get out to see some dogs work. You said you have had dogs in the past so you know it is a long term commitment and you don't want to make a quick decision just because there are some pups available now. There will always be litters.

 

If you are interested in pointing dog you should look into a navhda clinic when they start back up after hunting season. It will give you a chance to see a few different dogs and network with some experienced trainers.

 

Good luck.

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I have always had flushers, but if you want a pointer go get it and don't look back. There is nothing like a field dog that is a family and hunting companion. Dogs are the best!

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Edited by Batsto
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If you haven't deduced by now, yes you can have a hunting dog that's a family fun pet.  Brittanys are well known for their home behavior and hunting abilities.  Me I'm partial to wookies (aka The Griffs).  One thing though, all hunting dogs are high energy and will require some running around every day.  Once formal training is done, it's reinforcement training.  If you don't, you fined yourself yelling at the woods wondering where your dog ran off too!! :rant:

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If you haven't deduced by now, yes you can have a hunting dog that's a family fun pet. Brittanys are well known for their home behavior and hunting abilities. Me I'm partial to wookies (aka The Griffs). One thing though, all hunting dogs are high energy and will require some running around every day. Once formal training is done, it's reinforcement training. If you don't, you fined yourself yelling at the woods wondering where your dog ran off too!! :rant:

That is a cool looking dog
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Here's our brittany, Brodie.  His second season out.  Great pet and proving to be a great hunter.  Needs a lot of exercise like all sporting breeds but the perfect size, under 40 lbs.

 

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Laugh as everyone else did. I'm putting my money on a mini dushound. I had one for 14.5 years hunted him for 13.5 we missed his 11.5 year cause of lymes and a bad disk in his neck. Over his 13 year career we killed in the ballpark of 400 nj stocked pheasants. Stocking days we were done in 5 minutes non stock days we would normally be done in 2 hours. We killed every year 30 to 40 birds, with him I smiled every time I spent $40 for a stamp cause I knew I was getting my money worth. No formal training, but he'd track deer and birds like no one's business. Did I get lucky absolutely, one day I will get another for sure and begin birding again, the nice thing is with little dog like that I took home quite a few birds that were full roasters cause he would chase them into cover some thick they could not open wings to fly and he'd grab and shake.

One last funny story one Thanksgiving morning, I had an old man laughing at me and my dog, he said you need a Britney if you want birds, I let him have his moment and we made our way out, place was packed and by happen chance wound up same field as him. He started walking first once about half way down cut corners field we walked in, my dog immediately got birdie and not 50 yards into field I had a hen in the air and on the ground. Best part is guy turned around so quick he was still able to see feathers falling. I gave him a thumbs up and he started yelling at his dog. Pure awesome.

You can make any dog a birder, but sometimes you get lucky as I did and get the best of both, a total killer and soft as a cream puff at home buddy.

 

That is one awesome hot dog.  My sister has two of them and they are both great dogs.

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Before you decide on any breed,why don't you go and hunt with someone who has dogs to find out what it's all about. Then you'll be able to make up your own mind on what it is you do and don't like. Remember you're gonna have this animal for a long time!!!!!!! I'm sure there would be people who have dogs that would take you. There's allot to consider. Don't just take someone's word who's had 1or 2 dogs from one breed they have nothing to compare. It's been my experience it's usually GSP people saying buy this one or buy that one, it's more than likely their first pointing dog that they've ever owned and they've had a good experience and I think that's wonderful. I'm not knocking anyone or any breed just saying to you there's a ton of really good dogs out there find out for yourself what it is and which one YOU like. For me if it doesn't have a tail and start with the word ENGLISH well i stop right there but that's ME. Best of luck if I can answer any questions I'll try.

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To answer your question, yes.  You can certainly have a great house and hunting pal.  I never bought into the whole "one or the other" mentality.  Each breed is different and each dog has it's own personality.  I'm a GSP fanatic and can't say enough good things about the breed.  They hunt hard, clean up easy due to the shorthair, typically have a great disposition and energy for days in the field... and at home.  As RPK said, great family and hunting dog but the blessing of energy can also be seen as curse.  They truly have energy for days.  Mine require a good run/hike EVERY day.  It's a commitment that you should be prepared to make if you do decide to go with a GSP.  Sometimes it does seem like a chore, but the enjoyment that my family gets out of my dogs more than makes up for it.  With that said, there are many good breeds to hunt over and as with most things, you get out of it what you put into it.  Good luck with your choice.

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I know many field champions that sleep in bed with their owners.  Our Brittany does as did his great uncle before him, and both are/were machines in the field.  You should take some time to understand the differences between breeds even within the pointing dog family.  Some are more easily trained than other breeds, and that might be of concern to you.  If you hire a good trainer, make sure you go out in the field when he is running your dog so you can learn what it is all about.  Don't just drop off pup and come back a few months later figuring the dog is fully trained and you're all set because you won't be.  

 

The breed with the "longest nose" will always be the pointer (formerly called the English pointer) as they have by far the most breeding to point game of all the dog breeds.  In fact, many of the other popular breeds were outcrossed with pointers to bring in that instinct, and that includes Brittany Spaniels back in the day.  But having the longest nose doesn't mean it will be the best dog in the house although it could.  There are tons of variables, and when you buy a pup you can only control so many of those variables.  If you want more of a sure thing, buy yourself a good started dog from a reputable breeder that trains and you can pay a ground fee to watch the dog run birds before you buy it.  Most of us get excited to bring a puppy home, I know because I'm one of them, but that doesn't always mean the dog will be a good hunter or a good house pet in the end.  The advantage of buying a started dog is you can see its personality and how it hunts.  But if it's a year or older, you likely will not have as much impact on that dog's personality as you can when you bring home a puppy.  Lots to consider!    

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Bucks& bows knocked it out of the park. Truer words could not be spoken. Very well put. Pretty nice over here, there's actually some intelligent life found

Edited by ruffhills
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My Vizsla just turned 12 years old, still very healthy, but coming to the end of his hunting career, he's still going strong but not brush busting anymore like he used to, but still finding plenty of birds, he's been an outstanding dog dispite having me for an owner, and yes, he sleeps on top of me every chance he gets!!!!! And I wouldn't want it any other way. Lol

Edited by GhostBear
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